Frequently Asked Questions

Q:

How much do I need to water?

A:

The easiest way to determine if your turf grass needs water is the simple footprint rebound test. If the plants immediately rebounds (upright themselves) after a firm step of the foot, then the plants are not under stress from lack of water. If, however, the grass lays flat and does not recover quickly, it's probably time to give your turf grass a drink.


 

Q:

At what height should my turf grass be cut?

A:

The ideal cutting height for turf grasses is best determined by the species and management. Depending on your application (golf course greens or roughs, football fields or baseball diamonds), the height of each will vary according to your specific needs. For home use, Kentucky Bluegrass, Perennial Ryegrass and Turf type Tall Fescue is best cut at 2.5 to 4 inches. Bermuda, Centipede and Zoysia grasses should be cut at 1 to 2.5 inches.


 

Q:

How can I control weeds?

A:

Applying the appropriate pre-emergent herbicide at the proper time in the spring and fall will control most weeds. If the weeds have already germinated, then you should take a weed sample to your local lawn and garden center for identification and get their recommendation for herbicide use.


 

Q:

Is it necessary to reseed my turf grass every year?

A:

To answer this question, you really need to observe your lawn. Some grasses will recover from wear better than others. Bermuda, Zoysia and Centipede recover better than Turf Type Tall Fescue, Perennial Ryegrass and Kentucky Bluegrass.


 

Q:

Should I mulch my clippings or remove them from my turf?

A:

Clippings are approximately 90% water and may be mulched if the turf is mowed when dry and frequently enough to remove no more than 1/3 of the total leave length.


 

Q:

Should I aerate turf annually?

A:

Aerating at least once per year will help your turf grass tremendously. The increased air and water movement that aerating provides is very beneficial.


 

Q:

How often should I fertilize my turf grass?

A:

Fertilization frequency is determined by several factors, not the least of which is how you care for your turf. For example, if you bag your clippings (instead of mulching them), you will need to apply approximately 10% more fertilizer. Fertilizer recommendations can be found for each type of grass. You can also reference Pennington’s Annual Lawn Care program for seasonal recommendations.


 

Q:

Is there a turf grass that will grow in the shade?

A:

This is very region-specific. In the Southern United States, where warm season grasses are dominant, there is not a turf grass available that will perennially grow in dense shade. (Grass needs at least 4 hours of sun per day to grow and remain healthy.) In the Central Northern United States, however, Turf Type Tall Fescues and Fine Fescues will persist in the shade, though they will need to be reseeded over time. There are a few grass species that do well under shade conditions. In the Northeast, under dry, shady conditions such as under the canopy of oak trees, the fine fescues are the most versatile. They tolerate dry, infertile conditions and will persist where both perennial ryegrasses and Kentucky bluegrasses would struggle to survive. In the transition areas, fine fescues will perform well; however, the turf-type tall fescues such as Rebel III, Palmer's Pride Sun and Shade, and Palmer's Pride Shady Lawn have been the desired grasses as they are quite tolerant of conditions which range from full sun to full shade.


 

Q:

There is a specific area in my lawn where grass will not grow. What can I do to fix this problem?

A:

There are a variety of reasons that could cause lack of growth: soil issues (compaction of soil, contamination of soil), environmental issues (dense shade, low-lying area that doesn't drain well), etc. To remedy the situation, you'll need to determine the cause of the problem. You may need to take a soil sample to determine fertility and presence of contaminants or simply observe the area for possible environmental issues.


 

Q:

Why Should I HydroSeed?

A:

There are many advantages of choosing to HydroSeed.  Just some of those advantages are outlined below:

 

  • HydroSeeding gives sod-quality turf at a fraction of the cost.
  • HydroSeeding is great for tough to seed areas that are subject to erosion.
  • HydroSeeding allows Seed and Nutrients, fertilizers, to be chosen specifically for the Triangle area.
  • HydroSeeding seed is "packaged" with all the necessary fertilizers and nutrients to ensure strong and rapid root development.
  • HydroSeeding seed germinates faster.
  • HydroSeeding allows a larger percentage of the grass seed to germinate, producing a full more lush lawn.


 

Q:

How Does HydroSeeding Control Erosion?

A:

Home Owners:

 

  • HydroSeeding can control ditch erosion for home owners at a
    fraction of cost of piping.
  • HydroSeeding will eliminate the run off of soil into neighboring
    lawns, streets and driveways while producing a permanent beautiful
    cover.

 

Builders:

 

  • HydroSeeding is a cost effective way to stabilize the soil around
    the foundation while building the remainder of the home.
  • HydroSeeding is a cost effective insurance to enhance and eliminate
    Run-off into streams and river basins, coupled with silt fencing,
    eliminating the high price of fines.

 

Developers:

 

  • HydroSeeding the entrances and ditch lines of your new
    development is a cost effective, easy way to have the look
    you desire at a fraction of the cost of sod.


 

Q:

How Do I Care For A Newley HydroSeeded Lawn?

A:

After the HydroSeeding process is complete the watering schedule is the most important aspect of any grass seed germination.

Attention to frequent and consistent watering is the most crucial element in insuring the success of your lawn. For the first few weeks after HydroSeeding, the lawn should be kept moist by watering twice daily at least 10 minutes each time.

When the grass is approximately 3 inches tall it is ready for the first cutting. Be sure that the mower blades are sharp to guard against tearing the grass. Torn or ripped grass is susceptible to attack by disease. Never cut more than 1/3 of the grass at a time.

When the yard was hydro seeded, it was sprayed with a high potassium fertilizer to promote rapid and strong root development and growth.

After the first cutting, and if the weather is not too hot, you can apply a high nitrogen fertilizer to stimulate leaf and stem growth.

Remember, watering is the most critical element in assuring that you will have a beautiful lawn. A easy to follow, written, detailed description will be provided after the HydroSeeding process designed specifically for your new lawn.

Click Here to view pictures that will give you an idea of what to expect depending on the types of grass you have selected.


 

Q:

Do I Need To Have My Yard Prepared Prior to HydroSeeding?

A:

The condition and type of the soil under the grass is the most important element to the overall health of your lawn. In situations where you are putting in a new lawn you will have ample opportunity to prepare the soil before the grass is planted. This service is included in the price given by Carolina HydroSeeding. It is a good idea to have the soil tested before establishing your new lawn. Ask how simple we can get the test done for you. The soil test report gives the type and amount of fertilizer to apply for your lawn. This fertilizer (and lime, if required) should be worked into the top three to six inches of your soil. Once your lawn is established it is hard to do much to improve the soil at the root level.

 

Proper preparation of the soil is the first step in attaining a healthy lawn, just as with your home having a solid foundation. The soil should be pulverized thoroughly, Carolina HydroSeeding uses pulverizing equipment designed especially for soil preparation. If you've added topsoil to your yard, you will want to be certain that it is well mixed in with the soil underneath. Otherwise it is possible that the roots of your lawn may not penetrate the native soil. If the tilth of the soil is very heavy or sandy, organic material such as peat moss, compost, sludge or even sawdust should be added. (If sawdust is added to the soil it is wise to add extra nitrogenous fertilizer to compensate for the nitrogen loss caused by the composting of the sawdust.) Carolina HydroSeeding recommends a 50/50 blend of screened top soil and organic waste. We have found in this area the 50/50 blend provides a great foundation to produce a lush green lawn.
Most lawn grasses do well in mildly acid soil with a pH of 6.0 to 7.5, preferably about 6.5. You need to decide what type of grass you want to grow, according to your climate, soils, and what the lawn will be used for.